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#go

Developer favorites & language growth

Go Developer Survey 2019: 79% of Go devs need generics

#go

It isn’t just the allure of the cuddly blue mascot that makes Golang a great programming language. The Go Developer Survey 2019 Results have been released and it shows that despite some hurdles, Go is loved in the enterprise.

A Golang MVC framework for building web services

Web Service with Go and Go-Web

#go

Go-Web reduces the need for “repetitive” tasks like explicitly binding routes, actions, and middleware; while not problematic per se, programmers may want to adopt “ready-to-use” solutions, for instances if they want easily build complex services, aiming at a reduced “productive lag”.

A fresh breath of Go²

Goxygen generates web projects with Go

#go

Time to put the spotlight on a new open source project. Goxygen generates web projects with Golang, Angular, React, Vue, and MongoDB in just seconds. Have a brief look at what this tool accomplishes, its requirements, what its future plans include, and how you can help contribute.

Last week's highlights

Weekly Review: JEP 372, GitLab 12.8 & top 10 frameworks in 2020

Every Monday, we take a step back and look at all the cool stuff that went down during the previous week. Last week, the second Java enhancement proposal (JEP) of 2020 landed, and we took a first look at our JAXenter survey results. Also check out the new features in GitLab 12.8 and see how Project Fugu strives to standardize Progressive Web Apps.

Wake me up before you Golang

Go 1.14: Module support in the go command is production-ready

#go

Every six months, a new Golang release arrives. Go 1.14 is here and it includes some changes to the language, as well as improved defer performance and a more efficient page allocator. With 1.14, module support in the Go command is now officially ready for use in production. Users are now strongly encouraged to migrate to go modules.

Pack it up, pack it in

Experimental JavaScript bundler and minifier uses Go for speed

JavaScript bundling can take a long time, but does it have to be that way? Created as a hobby project, esbuild shows that JS bundling does not have to be so slow. Let’s take a look at this project, how its benchmark results compare, see how it works, as well as check up on webpack and what is on the agenda for the long-awaited arrival of Webpack 5.

International developer insights

Coding bootcamps & YouTube: Developers in 2020 learn via non-traditional methods

The typical developer is changing with increasingly varied and non-traditional ways to learn how to code, such as videos, self-guided lessons, and coding bootcamps. Are they useful? This study by HackerRank says yes! Follow the current trends in development, see what language developers around the world hope to learn in 2020, and what job role is the most in-demand.

Here's to 100 more

Go turns 10: What does the next decade have in store?

#go

Blow out the candles, and make a wish. We are taking a tour of Golang’s growth from the new kid on the block to one of the most used programming languages of our era. It’s not just the cute mascot that draws in programmers (but it doesn’t hurt)! Take a look at what the language is commonly used for and what future plans are in store for the coming years in Go version 2.

Boosting productivity with Go

How Curve is getting ahead with Golang

#go

Golang was created for achieving maximum user efficiency and coding productivity. Programmers who are already familiar with Java or PHP can be trained in Go in just a few weeks (and many will end up preferring it). In this article, Dewet Diener explores the pros and cons of Golang and how its test driven development (TDD) is the perfect fit.

Go fetch the new update

Golang 1.13: Error wrapping, improved performance, new default proxy

#go

It’s time! Version 1.13 of Golang has arrived, with new language changes in tow and some performance improvements. This time around, changes include a more uniform and modernized set of number literal prefixes, improved modules support, error wrapping, TLS 1.3 on by default, and a few more tweaks.

Getting smaller and smaller

How small can TinyGo squeeze down WebAssembly?

Since we covered TinyGo last year, it has expanded its reach and seen several updates. This Go compiler for microcontrollers, modern web browsers, and command-line tools also can compile Go to WebAssembly to create browser-based apps. How small can TinyGo squeeze down WebAssembly and what drawbacks and limitations does it have?