The missing piece between JIRA and Confluence

Atlassian buys Trello for $425 million

Now that Trello has been acquired by Atlassian, the Australian software maker is one step closer to fulfilling its mission: for their tools to be used by 100 million people.

Interview with GitHub's Marko Berkovic and Matthias Wiesen | DevOpsCon 2016

“At GitHub you don’t get locked into one culture”

More than 50 percent of GitHubers are working remotely so it is essential that they share the same values that everybody agrees upon. JAXenter editor Gabriela Motroc talked to GitHub’s Marko Berkovic and Matthias Wiesen at DevOpsCon 2016 about the company culture(s), the challenges to enforce it and the tips to make remote teams work.

Out now!

New JAX Magazine issue — Demystifying DevOps

DevOps has gone mainstream; everyone is talking about it, every company is trying to do it and every manager is trying to be successful at it. But for that to happen, we need to fully understand the facets of this buzzword and make sure we are truly ready to embrace it. This JAX Magazine issue is packed with goodies — it’s our treat!

SMACK — Next generation Big Data

Big Data becomes Fast Data

Big Data is changing. Buzzwords such as Hadoop, Storm, Pig and Hive are not the darlings of the industry anymore —they are being replaced by a powerful duo: Fast Data and SMACK. Such a fast change in such a (relatively) young ecosystem begs the following question: What is wrong with the current approach? What is the difference between Fast and Big Data? And what is SMACK?

To name a few

5 reasons why Scala is better than Java

The dominance (not to mention popularity) of Java has remained uncontested for years. Java continues to top almost all the lists of programming languages in respect of popularity, career scope, and industry preference. Java is great because of its versatility, strength and capacity to handle complex tasks. But is there anything better than Java? Can there really be one?

Interview with Anton Weiss | DevOpsCon 2016

DevOps: Fear of failure feeds our reluctance to change

Any DevOps transformation must start with the leadership’s support because otherwise, it will never become a concise, definitive transformation process. When we talk about culture, it seems to be something complicated but in reality, it is just a story to tell. JAXenter editor Gabriela Motroc talked to Anton Weiss at DevOpsCon 2016 about how to become DevOps enablers and what is the correct way to enable DevOps within an organization.

Keep calm and prepare for context switching

3 ways to switch gears without stalling

The software developer role has moved far beyond “a person concerned with facets of the software development process” as Wikipedia defines it. In addition to their core programming work, developers get immersed in marketing, support and other activities. This means they must continuously switch contexts, which can be extremely disruptive and stressful.

Interview with Armon Dadgar, co-founder and CTO at HashiCorp

DevOps at HashiCorp: “With independence comes ownership”

“Software organizations are composed of people, processes, and technology. While it’s easy to focus on just the technology, it is ultimately just an enabler of successful people and process.” We invited Armon Dadgar, co-founder and CTO at HashiCorp to weigh in on the company’s road to DevOps and to talk about DevOps Defined, their guide for adopting DevOps to accelerate application delivery.

Part 1

Common sense software engineering: Letter to a young woman

This article series resulted from a conversation Steve Naidamast had with a young woman who showed interest in learning how to program and possibly enter the IT profession. It is also an attempt to bring the realities of Information Technology profession as it is today into perspective so that a young woman interested in this field can make informed choices as to how she may be able to enter the field either professionally or for self-interest.

Interview with Matthew Skelton | DevOpsCon 2016

“We need to enable a culture of safety for experimentation”

Instead of a very simplistic approach, we need to look for collaboration and interaction patterns that work in different contexts. Collaboration comes with a cost but it produces very good results. However, sometimes it’s better to deliberately introduce a kind of boundary between teams. JAXenter editor Hartmut Schlosser talked to Matthew Skelton at DevOpsCon 2016 about the need for collaboration and what goes into good team structures.