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Java Lives!

Book Review: “Java Everywhere”

Geertjan Wielenga
Review image via Shutterstock

In a world running at breakneck speed to JavaScript, it is great to see that Java continues to innovate and provide solutions that deal with the new world and even manages to embrace it.

Imagine you were able to participate in the volatile JavaScript ecosystem without needing to work with JavaScript. “Sure,” you say, “that’s what GWT and Vaadin are for.” However, imagine you’d be able to deploy to iOS and Android while programming in native Java code. “No problem,” you say, “that’s what RoboVM and Dalvik are for.”

However, imagine that you’d be able to get hold of a single set of Maven archetypes that let you target all the screens of your life, i.e., the JavaFX WebView, as well as the native browsers on the desktop, iOS, and Chrome? And imagine that you could, just like in standard JavaScript applications, hand off your HTML files to designers, while you continue coding in the language you have grown familiar with over 20 years now, i.e., Java? HTML as the view technology, with Java for the business logic?

What kind of crazy world am I sketching out here? Nothing more or less than DukeScript. Fitted together over a few years by Jaroslav Tulach and Anton Epple, both well established names in the Java ecosystem, in particular in the NetBeans world, the promise of DukeScript is, at least potentially, precisely what Java developers have been looking for over the past years.

And, from today, the complete guide to DukeScript has been published on Leanpub.com, at https://leanpub.com/dukescript. Here’s what it looks like:

dukescript-the-book

As can be seen above, the book aims to be extremely practical. Not tied to any tool, editor, or IDE, the book steps you through all the concepts that underpin DukeScript. Among others, the Knockout two-way databinding framework is a crucial component of DukeScript, while the book provides you an introduction to this topic.

Sample applications are discussed and included, while typical development workflows are handled, including debugging, testing, and deploying.

In a world running at breakneck speed to JavaScript, it is great to see that Java continues to innovate and provide solutions that deal with the new world and even manages to embrace it. The DukeScript technology and the brand new book are both highly recommended to Java developers everywhere.

Get it here: https://leanpub.com/dukescript

Author

Geertjan Wielenga

Geertjan Wielenga is a supporter of many open source projects and product manager of NetBeans IDE.


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