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Interview with Bob Quillin, VP of developer relations for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

“Oracle Cloud Native Framework brings a holistic cloud native solution to developers”

Gabriela Motroc
cloud native
© Shutterstock / Andrey_Popov

Oracle Cloud Native Framework is the first cloud native platform of its kind, providing managed cloud services and on-premises software while offering a wealth of new services on the existing Oracle Cloud Infrastructure across applications, provisioning, and analytical verticals. We talked to Bob Quillin, VP of developer relations for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure about the benefits of this framework, his cloud native predictions for 2019 and more.

JAXenter: What benefits does a cloud native infrastructure bring? What are the drawbacks?

Bob Quillin: As organizations move to the cloud, they’re facing difficult challenges addressing cultural changes and increased complexity, on top of fearing vendor lock-in. A cloud native infrastructure not only brings a wide selection of tools and capabilities that work no matter which environment, but the use of open standards established by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) also ensures that vendor lock-in isn’t an issue.

JAXenter: Oracle recently announced the Oracle Cloud Native Framework. What is the goal of this framework and how can it help developers?

Bob Quillin: Oracle Cloud Native Framework brings a holistic cloud native solution to developers – whether they’re working in public cloud, on-premises, or hybrid cloud environments, Oracle’s infrastructure will support them. The new framework is the first cloud native platform of its kind, providing managed cloud services and on-premises software while offering a wealth of new services on the existing Oracle Cloud Infrastructure across applications, provisioning, and analytical verticals.

Among these services is Oracle Functions, a serverless solution based on the open source Fn Project, giving developers the ability to deploy and execute function-based applications without needing to manage infrastructure. These solutions will aid developers to create modern applications on the Oracle Gen2 Cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It gives its users choice while meeting their broad and varied deployment needs.

JAXenter: Oracle Cloud Native Framework is the first cloud native solution delivered and supported as both managed cloud services and on-premises software. What does this mean? What are its benefits?

Bob Quillin: This means that developers are able to enjoy the same capabilities and tools no matter which environment they are developing or deploying in: whether it be in a public or hybrid cloud, or on-premises. Thanks to this, developers are able to develop their applications and deploy them in any environment of their choice without having to rebuild them. This also means that business critical applications not yet able or ready to move to the cloud still enjoy the benefits of cloud-native tools and capabilities, despite living on-premises.

JAXenter: Oracle Functions is based on the open source Fn Project. What value does it bring to Fn?

Bob Quillin: Oracle Functions brings a fully managed, highly scalable, on-demand, Functions as a Service (FaaS) platform, built on enterprise-grade Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and powered by the open source Fn Project – a true open source based FaaS. With the announcement of Oracle Functions, a new breakthrough serverless solution based on the open source Fn Project, developers can easily deploy and execute function-based applications without the need to manage compute infrastructure.

In 2019, a second wave of cloud native will begin to reach into the enterprise to address key hurdles slowing traction with development teams – in particular around cultural change for developers, cloud native complexity, and cloud lock-in.

Oracle Functions is Docker container-based and completely pay-per-use, so charges are incurred only when functions are run. The underlying Fn Project, which Oracle Functions offers as a fully-managed service, can run on-premises, in a data center, or on any cloud.

JAXenter: Thanks to Oracle Functions, developers can now easily deploy and execute function-based applications without the need to manage compute infrastructure. What steps does it eliminate for developers? How will they deploy and execute function-based applications when using Oracle Functions? 

Bob Quillin: Instead of having to stand up compute, storage, and network infrastructure before even starting to run your application, with Oracle Functions all you need to do is:

  • Upload your code and configuration
  • Set up a trigger – HTTP or Event or Stream or Timer
  • Oracle Functions runs your code in response to the trigger
  • You only pay for compute resources used when your code is running

There is no need to setup, manage, and administer the underlying infrastructure – just upload you code and Functions takes care of the rest.

JAXenter: What does the future hold for cloud native? What are your predictions for 2019?

Bob Quillin: In 2019, a second wave of cloud native will begin to reach into the enterprise to address key hurdles slowing traction with development teams – in particular around cultural change for developers, cloud native complexity, and cloud lock-in.

Enterprises in 2019 will choose solutions that are inclusive and can cover cloud and on-prem, modern and traditional, dev and ops.  Managed cloud native services will replace do-it-yourself models so enterprises can leapfrog learning how to administer and maintain complex, rapidly changing cloud native platforms like Kubernetes and instead begin to directly start using them immediately.

Finally, truly open and community-driven solutions in areas such as serverless will replace proprietary cloud services as more open options allow enterprises to embrace open source, hybrid cloud, and multi-cloud options versus a single source cloud model that as left users with cloud lock-in issues, diminished choices, and spiraling costs.

Thank you!

Author
Gabriela Motroc
Gabriela Motroc was editor of JAXenter.com and JAX Magazine. Before working at Software & Support Media Group, she studied International Communication Management at the Hague University of Applied Sciences.

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