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Maika Möbus

Maika Möbus
Maika Möbus has been an editor for Software & Support Media since January 2019. She studied Sociology at Goethe University Frankfurt and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

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The latest PyCharm version has arrived

PyCharm 2019.3 offers support for Python 3.8 and more interactivity

JetBrains has released PyCharm 2019.3. The latest version of the Python IDE lets you use interactive widgets for Jupyter Notebooks—if you are using the Professional Edition. For paid and free versions alike, support for additional Python language features has been added. Let’s see what all has changed.

November's top news

Top 10 Java stories of November: Quarkus 1.0.0.Final, Java’s new ValueType and current plans for Java 14

December is here, so let’s take a look back and see what happened last month in the Java world, which remained as busy as always. More JEPs were confirmed for JDK 14—that means there are currently 14 features under consideration for Java 14. See what else happened from a new Quarkus release to the most popular programming languages, and read some inspiring new interviews from our series Women in Tech.

October release of VS Code is here

VS Code 1.40 closes 4,600 GitHub issues and adds new features

Visual Studio Code’s October update has arrived with new features. The source code editor now offers TypeScript 3.7 support, an activity bar indicator for the workbench, and more. The VS Code team also did some November “spring cleaning” and took care of thousands of GitHub issues.

Distributed deep learning with Apache SINGA

Apache SINGA is now an Apache Top Level Project

In October, the machine learning library Apache SINGA graduated from the Apache Incubator. Apache SINGA was built with a focus on deep learning and its features make it suitable for a variety of use cases—from healthcare to industrial application. Its maintainers also have some further projects for deep learning in mind.

Steering council accepted PEP 602

Python is switching to an annual release cycle

Python has picked up its pace! New major versions of the programming language will now be released every year, as opposed to the previous cycle of one and a half years. The change will affect the upcoming major version, Python 3.9, which will be moved forward by six months.

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