days
0
-50
-7
hours
-2
-2
minutes
-3
0
seconds
-4
-5
search
Profile: Aurika Savickaite, team leader behind Helmet Based Ventilation

Women in Tech: “Remain curious and enjoy technological & scientific developments”

Dominik Mohilo
women in tech

Women are underrepresented in the tech sector —myth or reality? Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Aurika Savickaite, team leader behind Helmet Based Ventilation.

research study by The National Center for Women & Information Technology showed that “gender diversity has specific benefits in technology settings,” which could explain why tech companies have started to invest in initiatives that aim to boost the number of female applicants, recruit them in a more effective way, retain them for longer, and give them the opportunity to advance. But is it enough?

Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Aurika Savickaite, team leader behind Helmet Based Ventilation.

Today’s Woman in Tech: Aurika Savickaite, team leader behind Helmet Based Ventilation

Aurika Savickaite, RN, MSN, was involved in the successful testing of the helmet ventilator in the ICU at the University of Chicago during a three-year trial study.

While in pursuit of a Master of Science in Nursing – Acute Care Nurse Practitioner degree at Rush University College of Nursing (2014), she wrote her capstone paper, Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV) for Treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure in Immunocompromised Patient, based on her experience with ventilation via the helmet.

Savickaite has worked as a registered nurse and patient care manager at the University of Chicago Medical Center, Medical Intensive Care Unit, and as a staff nurse at Vilnius University Hospital, Santariskiu Clinic, in the intensive care unit. She earned a Bachelor of Rehabilitation and Nursing at Vilnius University Faculty of Medicine in 2001.

Aurika Savickaite has been committed to community service for many years. Currently, she is a member of the Chicagoland Lithuanians Rotary Club.

When did you become interested in technology?

I was always interested in new developments and inventions in various areas. Technology can improve significantly our lives and it is never too late to learn new skills.

How did you end up in your career path? 

I have medical background and Master of Science in Nursing – Acute Care Nurse Practitioner degree at Rush University College of Nursing and worked as a registered nurse and patient care manager at the University of Chicago Medical Center, Medical Intensive Care Unit, and as a staff nurse at Vilnius University Hospital, Santariskiu Clinic, in the intensive care unit.

When I had a baby daughter, I wanted to be more in control of my own time and started my own company.

I did have to learn new things and tech applications, but I always had strong support and encouragement from my family.

Did you receive support from your family and friends? Do you have a role model?

Yes, my family and friends have been always supportive. Everyone should surround herself with people that help them grow. But I do not have specific role models – I try to learn from many different people, whose ideas and actions are close to my heart and values.

Did someone ever try to stop you from learning and advancing in your professional life?

Even if they did, I was finding my ways to move ahead. Every challenge has a solution. This is a matter of attitude, not to be a victim of circumstances, and to make your own choices.

Every challenge has a solution.

A day in Aurika’s life

I am a mom, wife, entrepreneur, and Rotarian. I started my day with some quiet time for myself, a cup of Bulletproof coffee, and watching the sunrise through my window. My husband David is very supportive and we share our time taking care of our daughter. I work remotely from home or go to the office. The evening is spent with the family, cooking some healthy meals, reading books, walking in the park or shore walk, or riding a bike.

What are you most proud of in your career?

Our latest project HelmetBasedVentilation.com is something I feel truly proud about and happy to be able to share the know-how with so many professionals around the world. This is also an example, how medical expertise, combined with an entrepreneurial mind and technology can make a global impact in a very short time.

Technology enables us to share the expertise and enable access, to connect people from different parts of the world, to discuss new ideas, to run training with fellow practitioners from different countries and broadcast worldwide.

Why aren’t there more women in tech?

We need to raise our kids supporting their natural curiosity and drive to discover new things. Everyone should be able to identify and develop their own talents. It all starts at the family and I expect schools also to encourage the kids to explore and learn.

Women also need to see more role models, or, simply saying, more women portrayed in the media as professionals, experts in various fields, making their own decision, not just following fashion trends or new recipes.

Could you name a few challenges (or obstacles) women in tech face?

There are still too few women, but numbers are growing. I think, sometimes women might have feel pressure from their personal backgrounds, especially if they come from more traditional, conservative families.

There are still many stereotypes about what jobs and careers are more “appropriate” for women, but the situation is changing.

Women should also believe in themselves, in their own ability to learn new things, to have the inner courage to change their paths at any age.

Would our world be different if more women worked in STEM?

Of course. More balanced and diversified teams can make better decisions, as they are better positioned to consider different aspects.

Women should also believe in themselves, in their own ability to learn new things, to have the inner courage to change their paths at any age.

The discussion about diversity is gaining momentum. How long will it take to see results from the current debate?

I believe the whole world is changing at unprecedented speeds. On one hand, it took centuries for women to get their basic civil rights, but today we have female astronauts flying to space. The more inspiring examples we will see in the mass media, the faster the change will be.

What advice (and tips) would you give to women who want a tech career?

Never stop learning and trust your own intellect and ability. To succeed in the tech industry, you have to have character strength, logical thinking, and the willingness to continuously learn new things. It does not require just mere physical strength, so everyone has the potential to succeed.

The tech industry is a very broad definition – there are so many different aspects and professions within, that everyone can find his or her place. I encourage everyone to remain curious and enjoy the technological and scientific developments that are happening daily.

More Women in Tech:

For even more Women in Tech, click here

Author
Dominik Mohilo
Dominik Mohilo studied German and sociology at the Frankfurt University, and works at S&S Media since 2015.

guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments