Design and GUI

This is how beautiful a Java UI can be

Melanie Feldmann

Codename-One founder Shai Almog recently emanated an apocalyptic vision of JavaFX in a blog post. A courageous statement, as JavaFX, as well as Swing still enjoys a huge user community. Users on Reddit have already shown that you can build really nice UIs using both technologies.

Pretty Java UIs seem to be especially widespread in the music industry. The DJ Software Ultramixer is an example. In the promotional video of the company, you can take a sneak peek at the modern and clear user interfaces. DJs need not only cool sound, but also cool software.

Bitwig Studio used for music production looks just as stylish. The UI here is not pure Java, but a large part of it is.

In the wonderful world of gaming

One of the most known examples of creative design and UI certainly has to be Minecraft. Even if not everyone stands on pixels, the success speaks for itself. Using Swing and a bit of JavaFX, the UI of Software Poker Copilot emerged aimed at helping poker players improve their game.

Business applications do not need to be boring either

Even business applications do not always need to be gray on gray. A beautiful example of this is the monitoring application for a container terminal by Java Magazine author Dierk König.

For Java in Java

Of course, you can also find good examples of beautiful UI design in the Java world itself. Many Java developers know and love Java IDE IntelliJ, not only for its design. Many an Eclipse user will have to admit that IntelliJ is simply prettier. SceneBuilder, the JavaFX editor written in JavaFX, doesn’t look too bad either: unpretentious, simple and gripping.

The demos of JavaFX also naturally show what is possible: take JavaFX Ensemble, for example.

Do you have any examples of a pretty Java UI? Share them with the Community and write a comment!

Author
Melanie Feldmann
Melanie Feldmann studied Technology Journalism at the Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, and works at S&S Media since Oktober 2015.

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