#rust

Wish list

What to expect from Rust in 2017

Rust had its one year anniversary in May this year but even though they celebrated a handful of achievements such as 11,894 commits by 702 contributors added to the core repository, 88 RFCs merged, 18 compiler targets introduced and nine releases shipped, they are ready to put the suggestions they received in the State of Rust survey into practice.

What to expect

Rust 1.7 stabilizes library functions and methods

The Rust team has introduced the latest version of the systems programming language -1.7, which continues the course of 1.6. What this release focuses on is library features -roughly 40 library functions and methods are currently stable in 1.7.

Windows gets Rust-y

Rust 1.4 highlights stability and Windows support

Have you been waiting for more code ‘soundness’ with Rust? Wait no more. A stable and steady agenda from the Rust core team gives us Rust 1.4, with Cargo and Windows support getting a boost along with type system tweaks. Stability has made its mark.

The dark arts of Rust

Rust 1.3 introduces The Rustonomicon

Have you ever wanted to try your hand at the mysterious, consecrated craft of unsafe Rust programming? Well, there’s now a book for that. The core team behind one of the hottest new languages presents the first draft of The Rustonomicon.

Safe systems programming

Why you should take a closer look at Rust 1.0

Blazingly fast performance, prevention of nearly all segfaults and low-level control and performance without sacrificing safety or abstractions – these are the promises made by the 1.0 release of Rust. And that’s just the start.

Getting Rust-y

Rust 1.0 is here and stable

A commitment to stability has helped churn out Rust 1.0, with claims of blazingly fast performance, prevention of nearly all segfaults and guaranteed thread safety. Being open source and now also openly governed is the icing on the cake.