#microservices

Event-driven architecture

Reactive Microservices with Scala and Akka

In this article, Vaughn Vernon, author of “Implementing Domain- Driven Design”, “Reactive Messaging Patterns with the Actor Model”, and “Domain-Driven Design Distilled”, will teach you a first approach method to designing microservices, giving you a workable foundation to build on. He will introduce you to reactive software development and summarize how you can use Scala and Akka as a go-to toolkit for developing reactive microservices.

Reactive Microservices with Eclipse Vert.x

In this article, Clement Escoffier, Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, gives an overview of Vert.x and goes through an example of reactive microservice application while focusing on the different key parts of such a system.

Monitoring a Kubernetes-backed Microservices Architecture with Prometheus

Prometheus and Kubernetes – a match made in open-source heaven

As many startups of the last decade, SoundCloud’s architecture started as a Ruby on Rails monolith, which later had to be broken into microservices to cope with the growing size and complexity of the site. The microservices initially ran on an in-house container management and deployment platform. Recently, the company has started to migrate to Kubernetes. In their talk at the DevOpsCon, Fabian Reinartz and Björn Rabenstein demonstrated the current Prometheus setup at SoundCloud, monitoring a large-scale Kubernetes cluster.

It's not necessarily a search-and-destroy mission

Why use microservices?

Gartner projects that the worldwide public cloud services market will grow 16.5 percent by the end of this year. 451 Research found that 40 percent of companies surveyed are going to prioritize the mobilization of general business apps over the next two years. Trends like these have led developers to rapidly adopt microservices for building applications. As business needs change, forward-thinking companies are modifying, scaling and updating their apps continuously with the help of microservices.

Interview with Josh Long, Spring Developer Advocate at Pivotal

“The most important benefit of microservices is agility”

No software architect can resist the temptation to talk about their experience with microservices. We launched an interview series with experts who talked about the benefits and challenges of microservices, when people should not use them and what impact they have on an organization. Our fourth interviewee is Josh Long, the Spring Developer Advocate at Pivotal.

Why are microservices important for you? — Part 3

“Microservices should not be used if the organization is not embracing DevOps principles”

No software architect can resist the temptation to talk about their experience with microservices. We launched an interview series with experts who talked about the benefits and challenges of microservices, when people should not use them and what impact they have on an organization. Our third interviewee is Daniel Bryant, Chief Scientist at OpenCredo and speaker at the upcoming JAX London.

MicroProfile 1.0 is here

MicroProfile 1.0: HTTP is not the only way microservices communicate

MicroProfile 1.0 is intentionally feature-constrained so that a broader community can define its roadmap. The parties involved (Red Hat, IBM, TomiTribe, Payara, LJC and now SouJava) have agreed on a base set of features that defines solid and stable roots on which to grow and have added multiple member organizations and contributors. But that’s not all.

The perks of Typhoon

End-to-end latency challenges for microservices

There is pressure to define a global platform architecture and purify concepts of core business within it. Microservices is an appropriate design style to achieve this goal – it lets us evolve systems in parallel, make things look uniform, and implement stable and consistent interfaces across the system. Unfortunately, this architecture style brings additional complexity and new problems. Network latency is crucial for online businesses with a direct impact on sales.