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#microservices

With great power provided by microservices comes great responsibility

Testing Java Microservices: Not a big problem?

The microservice architecture has become the defacto best style for implementing web-based applications. However, with the “great power” provided by microservices comes great responsibilities and challenges. In this article, Daniel Bryant, Chief Scientist at OpenCredo and JAX DevOps speaker talks about the challenges of testing Java-based microservices.

Microservice architecture to the rescue

Using microservices to power fashion search and discovery

Microservices became a design style to define system architectures, purify core business concepts, evolve solutions in parallel, make things look uniform, and implement stable and consistent interfaces across systems. In this post, Zalando’s Dmitry Kolesnikov discusses the company’s principles for microservice development of stateful solutions such as fashion search and discovery.

We brought some sanity back in how we build and run software

From the Monolith to Microservices

As projects got bigger and the number of teams and modules involved increased, it became obvious that the monolith approach wasn’t scalable anymore for a number of reasons. In this post, Mete Atamel, Developer Advocate at Google and speaker at JAX DevOps 2017, identifies four reasons why the shift from monolith to microservices has become necessary.

Interview with Björn Rabenstein, Production Engineer at SoundCloud

“Prometheus itself is a product of a DevOps mindset”

A lot of companies and organizations have adopted Prometheus and the project quickly gained an active developer and user community. It is currently a standalone open source project maintained independently of any company. In 2016, Prometheus joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as the second hosted project after Kubernetes. We talked to Björn Rabenstein, engineer at SoundCloud and Prometheus core developer, about how Prometheus can help companies adopt DevOps.

Event-driven architecture

Reactive Microservices with Scala and Akka

In this article, Vaughn Vernon, author of “Implementing Domain- Driven Design”, “Reactive Messaging Patterns with the Actor Model”, and “Domain-Driven Design Distilled”, will teach you a first approach method to designing microservices, giving you a workable foundation to build on. He will introduce you to reactive software development and summarize how you can use Scala and Akka as a go-to toolkit for developing reactive microservices.

Reactive Microservices with Eclipse Vert.x

In this article, Clement Escoffier, Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, gives an overview of Vert.x and goes through an example of reactive microservice application while focusing on the different key parts of such a system.

Monitoring a Kubernetes-backed Microservices Architecture with Prometheus

Prometheus and Kubernetes – a match made in open-source heaven

As many startups of the last decade, SoundCloud’s architecture started as a Ruby on Rails monolith, which later had to be broken into microservices to cope with the growing size and complexity of the site. The microservices initially ran on an in-house container management and deployment platform. Recently, the company has started to migrate to Kubernetes. In their talk at the DevOpsCon, Fabian Reinartz and Björn Rabenstein demonstrated the current Prometheus setup at SoundCloud, monitoring a large-scale Kubernetes cluster.