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#jep

It's a JEP!

JEP 380: Unix-domain socket channels

Another day, another JEP. The goal of JEP 380 is to introduce support for Unix-domain socket features that are common to the major Unix platforms and Windows. This will be achieved by adding a handful of API elements. Let’s take a closer look.

It's a JEP!

JEP 378 – Text blocks leave preview in JDK 15

Text blocks were added to Java as a preview feature in JDK 13. With JDK 14 the feature was previewed for a second time with the addition of two more escape clauses. Now, text blocks will be a full-fledged feature in JDK 15 because the community is in agreement: text blocks are ready. Let’s take a closer look.

It's a JEP!

JEP 376: ZGC – Concurrent Thread-Stack Processing

Almost there – Garbage collection with the Z Garbage Collector is almost completely free of infamous safepoint operations. Stack processing is the only thing not really running in a concurrent phase yet. JEP 376 addresses exactly this problem and should finally put an end to unnecessary pauses. Let’s take a closer look.

It's a JEP!

JEP 374: Disable and Deprecate Biased Locking

A new candidate Java enhancement proposal, or JEP, aims to disable biased locking by default, and deprecate all related command-line options. Biased locking is costly to maintain, especially since the gains previously seen have diminished to a point where the effort is no longer worth the reward. Let’s take a closer look.

It's a JEP!

JEP 373: Reimplement the Legacy DatagramSocket API

A new candidate Java enhancement proposal, or JEP, wants to overhaul the implementations of two APIs that have been around since the days of JDK 1.0. It’s not an easy job, but since the community is laying the groundwork to enable Project Loom to come to fruition, it’s a necessary one. Let’s take a closer look.

It's a JEP!

JEP 372: Remove the Nashorn JavaScript Engine

The second Java enhancement proposal (JEP) of 2020 has landed! Following JEP 371: Hidden Classes, now we have a second full-fledged candidate JEP with a decent shot at making it into JDK 15. That said, some voices in the community don’t agree with the proposal. Let’s take a closer look.

Just because you can't see it, doesn't mean it's not there.

JEP 371: Hidden Classes in Java

We’ve got our first Java Enhancement Proposal (JEP) of 2020. JEP 371 proposes to introduce “hidden classes”, which should improve how Java works with frameworks. In a future version of the programming language, dynamically created classes could be replaced by hidden classes in places. Let’s take a closer look.

Just the algorithm, not the GCs themselves

JEP 366: Deprecate the ParallelScavenge + SerialOld GC Combination

We’ve seen a lot of talk about different garbage collectors lately; JEPs 364 and 365 want to port the Z Garbage Collector to macOS and Windows respectively, JEP 363 wants to remove the deprecated Concurrent Mark Sweep (CMS) garbage collector. And now we have JEP 366, which is proposed to target JDK 14 and wants to deprecate the combination of the Parallel Scavenge and Serial Old garbage collection algorithms. Let’s take a closer look.

Something something Windows garbage

JEP 365: ZGC on Windows

The Z Garbage Collector or ZGC is a scalable low latency garbage collector that’s included in the JDK. Until now, it has not been compatible with Windows, but JEP 365 wants to change that. Let’s take a closer look at the future of Java.

A glimpse into the future of Java

JEP 364: ZGC on macOS

The Z Garbage Collector or ZGC is a scalable low latency garbage collector that’s included in the JDK. Until now, it has not been compatible with macOS, but JEP 364 wants to change that. Let’s take a closer look.

Déjà preview

JEP 368: Text Blocks (Second Preview)

Remember text blocks? That’s right, they were a preview feature in the recently released Java 13! Now that some time has passed, the community has a feel for them and where there’s room for improvement. With JEP 368, Jim Laskey proposes a second text blocks preview, this time with two more escape sequences. Let’s take a closer look.

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