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#java

Answering some common questions

Who? Why? What? Fix? – System.gc()

In this article, Ram Lakshmanan goes over some commonly asked questions about the System.gc() API call. What is System.gc()? How do you detect whether System.gc() calls are made from your application? What are the downsides of invoking System.gc()? Find out all this and more.

Simpler is better

JEP draft: Throughput post-write barrier for G1

Java Platform Team software engineer Man Cao has published a new JEP draft proposing to improve the performance of the G1 garbage collector when concurrent refinement is disabled. He proposes to do this by introducing a simplified post-write barrier. Let’s take a closer look at what could be the future of Java.

My data types are sealed

JEP 360: Sealed Types

A new Java enhancement proposal, JEP 360, has graduated from being a simple draft. It proposes to bring sealed types to Java, allowing developers to impose restrictions on which other classes or interfaces may extend or implement them. Sealed types could work in tandem with records, which is the business of its older sibling, JEP 359. Let’s take a closer look at the future of Java.

That's got to be a new record

JEP 359: Records

A new Java enhancement proposal, JEP 359, has graduated from being a simple draft. It proposes to bring records to Java, a new kind of type declaration. Records could work in tandem with sealed types, which is the business of its younger sibling, JEP 360. Let’s take a closer look at the future of Java.

All aboard the GitHub train

OpenJFX to follow Java and migrate to GitHub

OpenJFX is currently hosted on Mercurial, but with Project Skara in the pipeline and JavaFX already partially on GitHub, Kevin Rushforth thinks it’s time to talk about moving OpenJFX there as well. It couldn’t have come at a better time because Bitbucket announced this week that they are shutting down Mercurial for good next summer.

Last but not least

Gradle 5.6 released – faster Groovy compilation, new plugin for Java test fixtures & more

Gradle 5.6 is here, and is the last of the 5.x versions, so it’s a bit bigger than your average minor update. Among the changes are improvements to speed up Groovy compilation, a new plugin for Java test fixtures, and better management of plugin versions in multi-project builds. There’s also an important security update. Let’s take a closer look at what’s changed.