days
0
-47
-3
hours
-1
0
minutes
-2
-2
seconds
-3
-7
search

#java

Last week's highlights

Weekly Review: 25 years of Java, Grafana 7.0, Stack Overflow Developer Survey & more

Every Monday, we take a step back and look at all the cool stuff that went down during the previous week. Last week we celebrated 25 years of Java, spoke to seven experts about continuous delivery and continuous integration, learned more about the open source platform Grafana, and found out that Rust is once again the most beloved programming language.

Troubleshooting and resolution

Troubleshooting CPU spike in a major trading application

This article by Ram Lakshmanan examines an example of how to troubleshoot a CPU spike within a major trading application in North America. See what was causing the issue, how it was fixed, and what lessons you can take away.

Last week's highlights

Weekly Review: Plans for Java 16, Spring Boot 2.3, data science coding tips & more

Every Monday, we take a step back and look at all the cool stuff that went down during the previous week. Last week, Spring Boot 2.3 arrived and we took a look at Java’s migration to Git and GitHub, which keeps getting closer. Read on for more highlights including better coding habits for data scientists as well as interviews on Nordic language BERT models and the JavaScript framework Crank.js.

Here's to 25 more years of Java

To 25 glorious years of Java!

Java is turning 25 years old! Here’s a tribute to keeping the tradition of Java programming alive and well. This article takes a look back at the history of the programming language, how it transformed an era, and how it excels today in multiple spheres.

Step-by-step game creation

Avoid the Enemy! This is a simple game made with Kree.

Follow this tutorial and learn how to make a simple game using Kree Java. Learn how to create a scene, create a GameObject, add components to the GameObject, gather input from a user, create custom components, generate random numbers, and detect collisions.

Pack your things, we're moving!

Java 16: Migration to Git and GitHub gets closer

The move from Mercurial to Git and GitHub is imminent. With Java 16, the remaining projects – including the JDK itself – will finally move. Mercurial has been under criticism for some time now and Project Skara has presented clear results, the two corresponding JEPs have now been earmarked for Java 16. Let’s take a closer look.

Last week's highlights

Weekly Review: New JEPs, Gradle 6.4, Eclipse Theia explained & more

Every Monday, we take a step back and look at all the cool stuff that went down during the previous week. Last week, we took a closer look at two new JEPs, developer productivity during quarantine, and how to stay connected during these times. And also, if you have been wondering how exactly Eclipse Theia differs from Visual Studio Code, we’ve got you covered.

It's a JEP!

JEP 380: Unix-domain socket channels

Another day, another JEP. The goal of JEP 380 is to introduce support for Unix-domain socket features that are common to the major Unix platforms and Windows. This will be achieved by adding a handful of API elements. Let’s take a closer look.

Taking a fundamental approach

An Introduction to BDA for Java Developers

Working with BDA in Java relies on a number of tools. Most of these are open source, and when used together they form a BDA stack that provides a powerful level of functionality. This article examines some of the top tools.

It's a JEP!

JEP 378 – Text blocks leave preview in JDK 15

Text blocks were added to Java as a preview feature in JDK 13. With JDK 14 the feature was previewed for a second time with the addition of two more escape clauses. Now, text blocks will be a full-fledged feature in JDK 15 because the community is in agreement: text blocks are ready. Let’s take a closer look.

Supersonic subatomic Java

Quarkus – an IO thread and a worker thread walk into a bar: a microbenchmark story

A competitor recently published a microbenchmark comparing the performance of their stack to Quarkus. The Quarkus team feels this microbenchmark shouldn’t be taken at face value because it wasn’t making a like-to-like comparison leading to incorrect conclusions. Both of the two frameworks under comparison support reactive processing. Reactive processing enables running the business logic directly on the IO thread, which ultimately performs better in microbenchmark focusing on response time and concurrency. The microbenchmark should have been written so that both frameworks (or neither framework) obtain this benefit. Anyway, this turns out to be a very interesting topic and good information for Quarkus users, so read on.