Interview with Java Champion Lukas Eder

“Oracle’s ‘official statement’ was probably a necessary PR step”

Gabriela Motroc
Java EE
Lukas Eder

After Oracle’s president of product development Thomas Kurian told InfoWorld that the company has not abandoned Java EE and that it is planning to move it to the cloud, we asked Lukas Eder, a Java and SQL aficionado, to comment on the latest revelations about the battle for enterprise Java.

Discussions about the future of Java EE persist even after Oracle’s Thomas Kurian made it clear that Oracle has big plans for enterprise Java. People are still skeptical about Oracle’s strategy, which will be unveiled at the JavaOne conference in September. We invited Lukas Eder, a Java and SQL aficionado, to react to Kurian’s announcement.

 

JAXenter: Oracle’s president of product development Thomas Kurian told InfoWorld that the company wants to move Java EE into the cloud. What’s your take on that? 

Lukas Eder: At some point, Larry Ellison was laughing about the cloud. Today, Amazon is the single ruler of the cloud and most competitors are having a really hard time convincing anyone that they’re still relevant to tomorrow’s business. So is Oracle. With Oracle 12c being the “cloud database”, it’s not surprising that WebLogic (and thus Java EE) will also need to move into the “cloud”. Whatever that means. In the end, it might just be mostly marketing.

I don’t believe that Oracle is interested in the JCP and the Java “community”.

Given the recent noise about Oracle losing interest in Java EE, this “official statement” was probably a necessary PR step.

JAXenter: Mr Kurian said that Oracle is trying to reboot Java EE. Do you think Java EE truly needs a reboot?

Lukas Eder: It’s hard to say. As I mentioned in my previous interview on JAXenter, I don’t believe that Oracle is interested in the JCP and the Java “community”. Oracle envies Microsoft for being the single ruler of the .NET platform. So, clearly, Oracle needs to “reboot” Java EE – mostly from a legal and product management perspective.

The community, however, needs Java EE to advance steadily and backwards compatibly.

Oracle’s next steps are very likely to contribute to the fragmentation of the Java ecosystem.

Long story short: It looks like we’re going to see two different “Java EEs” in the near future. The “old” one (community-driven) and the “new” one (whatever Oracle plans).

JAXenter: Will MicroProfile become obsolete after Oracle announced that it hasn’t abandoned Java EE?

Lukas Eder: No. Oracle’s next steps are very likely to contribute to the fragmentation of the Java ecosystem. MicroProfile will be able to continue to stand on its own feet as an independent vision of how to architect microservices systems. Much like Lagom from Lightbend will offer yet another proprietary open source option.

Things will stay interesting!

Thank you very much!

Author
Gabriela Motroc
Gabriela Motroc is editor of JAXenter.com and JAX Magazine. Before working at S&S Media she studied International Communication Management at The Hague University of Applied Sciences.

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