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Lowering the barrier for developers

GitHub makes unlimited private repositories free for all

Sarah Schlothauer
github
© Shutterstock / Michael Vi

GitHub has lifted the limit on its private repositories, allowing an unlimited amount of collaborators for all users. According to GitHub, this is not a temporary bonus. Unlimited private repositories are here to stay! Furthermore, team pricing has been reduced.

A new update from GitHub helps break down potential software development barriers. As of Tuesday, April 14, 2020, all of GitHub’s core features are now available for free, providing teams more open access, with none of the cost.

Previously, the free plan included a limited number of collaborators in private repositories. Now this limit is lifted, allowing an unlimited amount. According to GitHub, this is not a temporary bonus. Unlimited private repositories are now a permanent feature and here to stay!

Will you be taking advantage of this new offering?

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Private development for all

Of course, in today’s working from home landscape, this move will likely be helpful for many software development teams as they continue to work remotely on collaborative open source projects. (Be safe, stay at home and code!)

From the announcement blog post by Nat Friedman:

Until now, if your organization wanted to use GitHub for private development, you had to subscribe to one of our paid plans. But every developer on earth should have access to GitHub. Price shouldn’t be a barrier.

This means teams can now manage their work together in one place: CI/CD, project management, code review, packages, and more. We want everyone to be able to ship great software on the platform developers love.

Reduced plan pricing

In addition to this update, the price of the Team plan has been reduced in half. Now, the team plan begins at $4 per user/month, effective immediately.

Review the pricing plan for the full layout of currently available options.

GitHub Free includes unlimited public/private repositories with unlimited collaborators, 2,000 Actions minutes/month, 500MB of GitHub Packages storage, and community support via the forums.

GitHub Pro will now include 2GB of Packages storage and 10GB of data transfer with a new reduced price of $4 per month.

The Team option includes all of the aforementioned, required reviewers, 3,000 Actions minutes/month (starting May 14, 2020), 2GB of GitHub Packages storage, and code owners.

View the FAQ for additional information about this announcement, the new pricing plans and how to upgrade/downgrade.

SEE ALSO: Eclipse Theia vs. VS Code: “Theia is one of the most diverse & active projects”

A battle of Gits

Competition between services is really heating up with this announcement. Previously, GitLab’s free plan already offered unlimited private repository collaborators. Now the two are evenly matched in this regard.

Currently, the GitLab free plan includes running your continuous integration (CI) pipelines for up to 2,000 minutes, unlimited private and public repositories and collaborators, and the ability to organize your issues into Scrum or Kanban boards.

The $4 per user/month plan includes all features from the free tier, the ability for team leaders to approve merge requests, multiple code reviewers, burndown charts, direct support with a 24 hour guarantee response time, and the ability to enable push rules.

Review all of the GitLab pricing plans and consider which is best for you and your team.

Do you use GitLab, GitHub, a different provider, or do you prefer to self-host instead?

Author
Sarah Schlothauer

Sarah Schlothauer

All Posts by Sarah Schlothauer

Sarah Schlothauer is an assistant editor for JAXenter.com. She received her Bachelor's degree from Monmouth University and is currently enrolled at Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany where she is working on her Masters. She lives in Frankfurt with her husband and cat. She is also the editor for Conditio Humana, an online magazine about ethics, AI, and technology.

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