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Is Oreo better than Nougat?

Manish Patel

© Shutterstock / HW Photowork

At first glance, Android Oreo doesn’t seem to be too different from Nougat but if you dig deeper, you will find a number of new and improved features. Let’s put Oreo under the microscope.

Android Oreo (the next update after last year’s Nougat) was launched in late August. Most of the Google Pixel or Nexus devices have already received the update as a part of a rolling schedule.

At first glance, Oreo does not seem to be too different from Nougat, but if you look at its features in more detail, you will find a number of new, improved and interesting features.

SEE ALSO: Android 8.0 Oreo launches with great fanfare

Some of the alluring features of Android 8 Oreo are as follows:

Better notifications

Ask anyone! Most of the users would vote this feature as the most attention-grabbing. Oreo now offers you the option to snooze your notifications for some time, just by swiping left. “Notification dots” are another fresh feature Oreo has brought in. They appear on your apps to point to the unread notifications. If you press on the dots for a few seconds, you can read your notification; and also view the application’s shortcuts. Another amazing feature notification bar is the option of customizing notifications by grouping them into a channel.

Performance matters

After updating your device to Oreo, you will notice that the system boots up much faster. Oreo has also come up with another new feature known as ‘per app disk space quota’, which facilitates the device to spontaneously delete cache from the apps when they go beyond accepted proportion, thus giving better space.

Easy accessibility

User friendliness is what attracts people towards Oreo. Now, your Google search will be even easier with the auto-fill option provided by Oreo. You can activate it in the “Language and Input” section of your settings menu. Adaptive icons available with Oreo make access of your apps far easier. Multi-windows option for video replay is an additional wonderful feature with which you can continue using your phone while the video is still playing.

Longer battery life

When you open and use an app, it runs in the foreground. When you quit using the app, it still keeps running in the background for some time. Thanks to Oreo, the device will stop the app from using background services, but it will instead force it to do scheduled jobs with periodic “on and off” mechanism, thus saving your battery more efficiently.

Enhanced audio experience

Oreo will also improve your audio experience. The ‘Volume Shaper’ feature presents preferences to ‘fade-in’/’fade-out’ or ‘cross-fade’ sound, which will enable audio transitions. ‘Audio Focus Request’ mutes other apps when a foreground app runs an audio rather than pausing it. Oreo also offers better playback options for both audio and video.

SEE ALSO: 10 reasons why you should switch to Kotlin for programming Android apps

Better security

Oreo is constructed on Project Treble that increases your phone’s security. The device will update itself faster. Oreo also has “Google Play” protect scans which help enhance the safety feature of your mobile apps.

Dramatic display

Oreo brings many small yet amusing updates like double-tapping to get 50% zoom on camera or an all-new emoji collection. It supports multi-display that allows users to transfer an activity from one screen to the other.

“See” it to believe it!

As already mentioned, there doesn’t seem to be much of a difference between Oreo and Nougat —at least at first glance. The home screen looks pretty similar, but you can very well see that the icons appear a lot more simplified and organized in Oreo. The biggest difference is that the design of the setting menu is changed.

With the above mentioned enhanced features, you can be sure that you’ll have a better experience with Oreo.

Author

Manish Patel

Manish Patel is a CEO of Concetto Labs, a leading mobile app development company specialized in Android and iOS app development.


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