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JAX Magazine - 2013 - 06

Java is dead. Java is the new COBOL. Java is a dead end for enterprise application development. We’ve all seen the above statements before, announcing the death of the object-oriented language that we all know and love. But we at JAX Magazine say these obituaries are premature and that the Java naysayers aren’t looking at the bigger picture. While Java’s not exactly dealt with the buzzword of the month well (mobile, cloud etc), it’s still a thriving hub of activity. Just take a glance at Netflix - responsible for ? of America’s streaming traffic at night and releasing open source tools coded in Java. Speaking of vibrant open source project, you may have heard of Hadoop, neo4j and Jenkins, all of which chose Java for its stability and general all-round usefulness. In this issue of JAX Magazine, we ponder what is to become of Java, while also keeping a close eye on some of the new breed. Abdelmonaim Remani gives his two cents on the ‘Future of Java’ debate with great trepidation, but makes with some extremely important points you may not have considered. Are we actually asking the right question to begin with? For a web framework perspective, Liferay’s James Falkner argues why standardisation isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Neale Swinnerton introduces to some functional fundamentals of the Clojure language, as we explore the JVM language that closely resembles the Lisp dialect. With the use of a simple abstraction, Neale goes through the basics of sequences, lazy evaluation, higher order functions. Samuel Santos continues our Java EE 7 series with a look at Bean Validation with JAX-RS, a key component of the recent enterprise release. Our final tutorial of the issue sees Vaadin’s Tapio Aali offer insight into the inner workings of the Java web framework, with sprinkles of jQuery and JavaScript thrown in. Elsewhere, we shine the spotlight on Stormpath this month, the startup offering a useful pain relief for authentication and account management and discuss the newest Eclipse release train Kepler. Are the open source foundation back on track? As you can see, we’ve managed to find the perfect mix of Java basics with a dash of innovation. Just like the landscape is at present.

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