Countdown to June for Juno

Eclipse Juno Milestone 5 arrives

Chris Mayer
Eclipse-Foundation1

Another milestone down for Eclipse 3.8 and 4.2. Juno is close. This update brings forth key Java Development Tool add-ons

The milestones are coming thick and fast for
Eclipse’s next release train Juno. The latest, Milestone 5 was
released this week and has added a number of vital functions needed
for the 4.2 release of the Eclipse platform.

These include improvements to the platform
itself, Java Development Tools (JDT), Plug-in Development
Environment (PDE) and Equinox, the OSGi side of the operation.
Here’s just a taster of what is

New and Noteworthy
within Eclipse 3.8 and
4.2 M5.

JDT

  • JDT will now raise null related errors/warnings
    for fields
    . It has three states in which these errors are
    raised:

Null pointer access warning

 

Potential null pointer access warning

Redundant null check warnings


  • The batch compiler can be
    configured to use annotations for null analysis by passing the
    token nullAnnot(nullable|nonnull|nonnullbydefault) to the -warn
    option, where nullable, nonnull and nonnullbydefault are the fully
    qualified names of the annotation types to be used for null
    analysis. You can use nullAnnot alone to use JDT’s default
    annotations.
  • JDT now performs smarter analysis so
    that resource leak related errors/warnings are ignored in
    unimportant cases.
  • It is also now possible to encrypt source
    attachments
    of libraries.

Platform

  • Navigation arrows have been implemented to switch between
    tabs in the shared area far easier.


PDE

  • A new preference page is available to dynamically set the
    debug-tracing options for Eclipse, through the Tracing Preference
    page.

Equinox

  • There is now customisable storage for preference scopes.
    When defining your own preference scope, you can now extend a
    simple storage customisation class rather than implementing all the
    preference logic yourself. In this class you simply define the code
    to read and write a preference node to whatever backing store you
    want to use.

For those wanting to go deeper into what has been
implemented into Juno so far, the release notes provide all the
details you need. With the next milestone scheduled for March 16,
we are well on the way to Juno’s judgment day in June. It appears
that the bulk has been done towards Juno and we’re excited to see
what else is in store for the release.

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